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COMMONS MAGAZINE

What’s So Bad About Spreading the Wealth?

What’s So Bad About Spreading the Wealth?

October 29, 2008

With John McCain’s screeching all over the campaign trail about Barack Obama’s supposed plans to “spread the wealth,” On the Commons Fellow Chuck Collins started thinking about what has actually happened to our economy over recent years.

“After three decades of ‘concentrate the wealth,’ we could really use some ‘spreading the wealth,” he writes on the website of the progressive Christian magazine, Sojourners.

The Public Domain as a “Jungle”

The Public Domain as a “Jungle”

October 28, 2008 | By David Bollier

For decades, the public domain was essentially ignored in legal circles. The first significant law review article on the topic did not appear until 1981, and scholarship on the importance of the public domain did not really take off until the mid-1990s, when the World Wide Web was exploding.

Extreme Individualism vs. Commons-based Society

Extreme Individualism vs. Commons-based Society

October 26, 2008 | By Jay Walljasper

The commons is an unfamiliar concept to most Americans, and one not likely to become a campaign issue in the closing week of the election. But it’s an underlying current of the presidential race that helps define the sharp differences between Republican and Democratic tickets this year.

Economics as the Deliberate Mis-measurement of Life

Economics as the Deliberate Mis-measurement of Life

October 23, 2008

OTC Fellow Jonathan Rowe talks with the Pacific Sun, the Marin County newspaper, about the erroneous ways that economists measure growth and progress – and the consequences for the rest of us. In the question-and-answer exchange with Don Speich, Rowe explains how “the economy” has become an enormous, media-inflated abstraction that celebrates all expenditures of money simply because they add to the Gross Domestic Product.

"Flow" Documents World Water Crisis

"Flow" Documents World Water Crisis

October 22, 2008 | By David Bollier

Another excellent film about the privatization of water and the brave efforts to fight it — Flow: For Love of Water — is opening in theaters around the U.S. The documentary, directed by Irena Salina, interviews scientists and activists around the world about the growing global water crisis. While most people expect that clean water will always be there by turning on the tap, in fact supplies of fresh water are disappearing or being privatized by a global water cartel.

Washington Post Endorses Cap-and-Dividend

Washington Post Endorses Cap-and-Dividend

October 22, 2008 | By Jay Walljasper

A commons-based solution to global warming is picking up steam. The Washington Post in an editorial just endorsed the Cap-and-Dividend approach to climate change.

The Obama campaign has also endorsed the concept, which it calls Cap-and-Rebate. The Post calls it Cap-and-Return.

The Lazy Smear of “Piracy”

The Lazy Smear of “Piracy”

October 21, 2008 | By David Bollier

As Hollywood studios and record labels watch a whole new online “sharing economy” arise – in which ordinary people create and share things online without having to buy “product” – Big Media is coming to a dismaying realization: the people formerly known as the audience are morphing into a participatory network. And this new social form is beating the hell out of an already-tattered business model.

Public Spaces as Sacred, Healing Spaces

Public Spaces as Sacred, Healing Spaces

October 16, 2008

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Tom and Kitty Stoner accidentally learned the power of community gardens as a place apart in London when they happened upon a small, quiet patch of green near Hyde Park. Impressed by the sense of serenity in the noisy, threatening urban landscape, they started a foundation to help create more than 120 public places in Maryland and neighboring states. They have spent more than $7 million to date creating sacred havens in mostly poor sections of cities such as Baltimore.

Reforming the So-Called Presidential Debates

Reforming the So-Called Presidential Debates

October 13, 2008 | By David Bollier

Have you wondered why the presidential debates don’t present any serious ideas or encourage any substantive exchanges about policy and political philosophy? Have you noticed that the events resemble a whirring jukebox of familiar sound bites – a highly produced, tightly scripted affair with with no surprises and little passion?

Boy Scouts Claim to Own the Word “Scout”

Boy Scouts Claim to Own the Word “Scout”

October 13, 2008

In 2002, attorney Greg Wrenn started a youth group call “Youthscouts” because he wanted his daughter to participate in an organization, unlike the Boy Scouts, that does not discriminate based on gender, sexual orientation, or religious beliefs. But despite countless uses of the word “scouts” before Boy Scouts of America was formed in 1910, and the existence in following years of the American Boy Scouts, the New England Boy Scouts, and the Lone Scouts of America, the Boy Scouts of America is now suing Youthscouts for violating its alleged trademark in the word “Scouts.”

A Chance to Spread the Word

A Chance to Spread the Word

October 10, 2008 | By Jay Walljasper

On the Commons seeks your help.

We are preparing a book, The Field Guide to the Commons, and we’d love your recommendations of what should appear in this book—from your own work and that of other people you know who are engaged in the subject. This could include anything from a blog entry you think captures some essential point about the commons to a meticulously thought-out manifesto or artwork.

Free Culture Convergence

Free Culture Convergence

October 9, 2008

The following was sent to On the Commons from Students for Free Culture, Berkeley chapter. Their manifesto says it all. “We believe that culture should be a two-way affair, about participation, not merely consumption. We will not be content to sit passively at the end of a one-way media tube…”

A New Dismal Science -- “Happiness Economics”

A New Dismal Science -- “Happiness Economics”

October 9, 2008 | By David Bollier

In the mid-1990s, my colleague Jonathan Rowe co-authored a major piece in The Atlantic about the gross deficiencies of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a way to measure national well-being and progress. The essential point was that our nation’s obsession with economic growth as an end in itself was (and is) trampling on all sorts of other forms of wealth that we must also nurture. We need stable families and communities as much as economic growth — and sometimes the two are in direct conflict.

Treating Health Care as a Commons

Treating Health Care as a Commons

October 7, 2008 | By David Bollier

From my reading of history, medical care was once a more intimate and ethical endeavor, a calling that involved a respectful communion between doctor and patient. However, in recent decades, at least in the United States, it is clear that medical care has become a technology-driven market transaction. Doctors who were once skilled at seeing illness in the context of the “whole person” are more likely, in today’s environment, to know how to rush patients through 15-minute assembly-line appointments and game the insurance/Medicare system with the right billing codes.

The Embarrassing Transience of Stadium Names

The Embarrassing Transience of Stadium Names

October 6, 2008 | By David Bollier

Imagine the public confusion that would result if your city government changed the names of major landmarks every few years at the behest of some corporation. Main Street could become Home Depot Avenue, and then a few years later, Budweiser Boulevard. This is roughly the scenario now playing out with sports arenas as companies are engulfed by scandal, acquired by other corporations and mismanaged into bankruptcy.

When Free Market Fantasies Collapse

When Free Market Fantasies Collapse

September 30, 2008 | By David Bollier

When irresistible political fantasies collide with inexorable economic realities, the result is…..abject confusion.

Vermont Protects Public Rights to Groundwater

Vermont Protects Public Rights to Groundwater

September 29, 2008

Who owns the water? While oceans, rivers and other surface waters have been recognized as part of the commons going back to the Magna Carta—and beyond that to the Roman Empire, when the public trust doctrine was articulated to ensure people’s right to use seashores—the issue of groundwater has been less crystal clear. In many cases, it’s assumed that landowners are guaranteed rights to all water below the surface of their property.

Video Game Pits Commoners vs. Enclosure

Video Game Pits Commoners vs. Enclosure

September 26, 2008 | By David Bollier

The commons has surely come of age now that there is a video game to illustrate the political dynamics of enclosure! A hearty commoners’ salute to Molleindustria, an Italian team of artists, designers and programmers who create “radical games against the dictatorship of entertainment.” Their latest creation is the flash-animation Free Culture Game: A Playable Theory.

Financial Markets As Commons

Financial Markets As Commons

September 26, 2008

In the fight over the bailout, the rhetoric of Main St. vs. Wall Street is politically important in contrasting the real economy with the speculative casino economy. But we should also embrace all financial markets as part of the commons that sustains healthy communities.

Our sophisticated financial markets have been built over several generations and are regulated at taxpayer expense through oversight institutions such as the Securities and Exchange Commission.

It's Time to Reconsider Government Ownership of Companies

It's Time to Reconsider Government Ownership of Companies

September 26, 2008 | By Jay Walljasper

At a moment’s notice, the old rules and certainties about our economy have been tossed out the window.

For almost 30 years, the clear message from corporate headquarters, economic gurus and Washington itself has been that government has no useful role to play in business. Deregulate everything in sight and then let the market can work its magic—that was Ronald Reagan’s recipe for prosperity, which was eventually endorsed by most Democrats.