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COMMONS MAGAZINE

(Photo by Mkorsakov under a Creative Commons license.)

To Stop Climate Change, Start Calling It By a Different Name

May 19, 2014 | By Jay Walljasper

It looks like climate deniers are finally back on the defensive.

To ensure safe drinking water for all, Arturo Quevedo vigilantly protects local watersheds for the municipal water utility in Loja, Ecuador. (Photo by Daniel Moss)

Clean Water Warrior

May 19, 2014 | By Daniel Moss

Arturo Quevedo, the engineer responsible for the watershed protection program for Loja, Ecuador’s municipal water agency, has a kind demeanor. His slightly crooked front teeth are prominent beneath his moustache as he waxes ebullient about clean water percolating through forested slopes, coursing through pipes, and hydrating Loja’s children. But don’t let the gentle, nature-lover exterior fool you. As tender as he is with the landscape, he is equally fierce in sniffing out water-polluting scum.

Manarola, one of five car-free Cinque Terre towns linked by trails and trains. (Photo by Kevin Botto under a Creative Commons license.)

Commons, Italian-Style

May 19, 2014 | By Jay Walljasper

I’m back from Cinque Terre--a string of five hillside towns on Italy’s Western seacoast where you feel like you’re vacationing in the 17th century but still enjoy modern wonders such as trains and cameras. Virtually unknown to US tourists thirty years ago, it is now a destination sensation complete with its own Rick Steves and Lonely Planet travel guides.

A New Generation of Great Public Spaces in Places You'd Least Expect

May 15, 2014 | By Jay Walljasper

The last place in the world you might think of looking for inspiration on spirited community togtherness is Detroit, a city still suffering from racial divisions and stark economic disinvestment.

Lelalnd Maschmeyer is a creative director in New York City and author of The Triumph of the Commons.

You No Longer Have to Own Everything You Use

May 14, 2014 | By Jessica Conrad

Most people don’t have time to sit around and contemplate the commons, says Leland Maschmeyer—an award-winning creative director and author of The Triumph of the Commons—because they’re busy with the “practical and pressing” stuff of life Can we fault them? No, of course not. The commons as a worldview and set of practices can appear fairly abstract and quickly turn “interest into disinterest ”

(Photo by College360 under a Creative Commons license)

Commons 101

May 7, 2014

The books on this list may not be easily acquired just because book stores are closing, libraries face budget cut-backs, and schools supplant the page with the screen, or the book with the computer. But if you’re reading this you already know that knowledge, like a place to meet, can be obtained with patience, resourcefulness, and working with others. I have listed the books in rough order of difficulty.

Robert Fulghum, All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten (New York: Ballantine Books, 1983)

 Free Press Pics under a CC license

How To Save Equal Access on the Internet

May 4, 2014 | By David Morris

With the announcement by the FCC that cable and telephone companies will be allowed to prioritize access to their customers, only one option remains that can guarantee an open internet: owning the means of distribution.

Thankfully an agency exists for this. Local government. Owning the means of distribution is a traditional function of local government. We call our roads and bridges and water and sewer pipe networks public infrastructure for a reason.

A walk to the local bagel shop. (Photo by Shawn Econo under a Creative Commons license)

How to Get the World Back on Its Feet

April 22, 2014 | By Jay Walljasper

What if there was a way to reduce the risk of many major diseases at the same time as helping improve your overall health, decreasing your weight and boosting your energy? And what if this treatment was simple to do and took only a few minutes each week?

Wait, it gets even better! What if this could be accomplished with no special equipment or training and it would cost absolutely nothing. You could do it any time and place you want--in fact, the vast majority of us have been doing it since the age of two.

Students at Keene State College. (Photo by Celt.Keene under a Creative Commons license.)

Commons Comes to Town

April 19, 2014

Traveling to New Hampshire last week to talk at Keene State College, I had no idea what to expect. Although I’ve spent quite a bit of time in Vermont and Maine, New Hampshire stands out for its libertarian leanings-- no state income tax, no state sales tax, license plates proclaiming “Live Free or Die”.

Photo by PennStateNews under a Creative Commons license.

How a Commons Way of Life Helps Curb Climate Change

April 19, 2014 | By Jay Walljasper

It’s easy to not think about the looming climate crisis. For one thing, it’s depressing to ponder the misery ahead if we don’t take drastic steps now to curb greenhouse emissions. It’s even more depressing when you consider that even the most modest steps to reduce carbon use in the US have been derailed by corporate lobbyists and ideological zealots.

Mike Rolliin

"The Wealth of Nations"

April 15, 2014

The Wealth of Nations

 

Kids playing in Chicago's Millenium Park. (Photo by Kymberly Janisch under a Creative Commons license)

Parks Are Crucial for Children and Other Living Things

April 14, 2014 | By Jay Walljasper

When my long-time friend John became a father, he confided to me that the world suddenly was divided into two distinct camps: people with children and those without. This puzzled me; I figured it was his excuse for being out of touch.

Photo courtesy of PM Press

Stop, Thief!

April 14, 2014

We’re losing the ground of our subsistence to the privileged and the mighty. With the theft of our pensions, houses, universities, and land, people all over the world cry, Stop Thief! and start to think about the commons and act in its name.

But what is the commons? Its 21st century meaning is emerging from the darkness of centuries past.

How Sharing Can Shift the Spirit of the Times

April 13, 2014 | By Jessica Conrad

Not long ago Neal Gorenflo, co-founder of Shareable--an award-winning news, action and connection hub for the sharing movement--called himself an “unlikely voice for sharing.” An epiphany in 2004 spurred him to leave his job as a corporate strategist and become a strategist for the common good. Without question, it was the right move for him. Gorenflo says his decision led him to develop a more collaborative lifestyle that’s “nothing short of magical.” 

Why Do I Work So Hard?

April 13, 2014

Car ads are generally not the place you look for inspiration about a commons way of life.  But a recent duel between GM and Ford offers a keen comparison of what’s at stake.

Indigenous Lenca people organized a human barricade to stop a dam on the Gualcarque river. (Photo courtesy of School of Americas Watch)

Indigenous People In Honduras Block Dam on Sacred River

April 13, 2014

“Screw the company trying to take our river, and the government. If I die, I’m going to die defending life.” So said María Santos Dominguez, a member of the Indigenous Council of the Lenca community of Rio Blanco, Honduras.

How to Revive Low-Income Neighborhoods

April 11, 2014 | By Jay Walljasper

Anchor institutions--hospitals, colleges, and other institutions deeply rooted in their communities--are a form of  commons that is viewed as crucial to revitalizing low-income neighborhoods.  Besides being major employers and big customers for local businesses, they have an intrinsic stake in making sure their neighborhoods thrive.  Your local hospital, for instance, is not going to pack up its beds and move to Mexico.

“Why Are We?”

April 11, 2014 | By Camille Gage

Camille Gage: What drew you to become a poet, to follow that path?

Crystal Williams: Well, firstly: when I was young my mother and I went to the library every week. I read voraciously and wasn’t allowed to watch much TV, though I could watch The Electric Company, or Sesame Street, but other than that my life was really about playing with my friends, being with my mom and dad, and reading. I had an uncle who loved poetry. He taught me my first poem and a real love of language.

Sharing Revolution

March 18, 2014

The recent rise of the commons and the sharing economy seems to suggest a growing recognition of the fact that our health, happiness, and security depend greatly on the planet and people around us.

When It Comes to Public Services, Government Knows Best

February 14, 2014 | By David Morris

Minneapolis will soon vote to shift nearly 180 privately owned bus shelters to public ownership following numerous complaints about the lack of maintenance and upkeep.  When it does it will join the burgeoning ranks of cities who have discovered that when it comes to public services government knows best.

When an article about this appeared in the local  Star Tribune newspaper many on-line comments echoed the conventional wisdom circa 2014. “It must be really, really bad if government can do it better.”